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Queen Elizabeth Sheds A Tear For Late Husband Philip

The Queen shed a tear for Prince Philip at an extraordinary service in remembrance of his remarkable life of service to Britain and his wife today.

Her Majesty stood in Westminster Abbey where she had personally ensured her beloved husband’s final wishes were fulfilled after his covid-hit funeral left her sat alone without the rousing hymns and guests he loved so much.

The 95-year-old monarch used a stick as she was walked to her seat by her disgraced son the Duke of York to give her ‘strength and stay’ Philip the send-off he wanted at a service attended by the Royal Family and his relatives, friends and people who benefitted from his charities. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were the only senior royals not there.

Despite battling mobility problems, she stood to pray and sing anthems during a 40-minute service that her husband of 73 years had helped plan for before his death last April. But chose Prince Andrew to support her as she arrived and left the church, clutching his elbow with one hand and a walking stick with the other.

The Queen had stood with tears in her eyes as the 1,800-strong congregation sang Guide Me O Thou Great Redeemer before the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out to mark the end of the memorial service for the Duke of Edinburgh.

After she leant on Andrew as she walked back out of the church, the Queen appeared to grimace as she walked to the car hunched over with the Duke of York at her side guiding her towards the Bentley.

She appeared to be holding tightly to her sticks and appeared to be making a great effort to get to the vehicle, concentrating very hard in taking each step. Once inside the car she appeared to be back to her normal composed self as the car slowly drove away. She waved to onlookers as she arrived and left the service.

The Queen listened as the Dean of Windsor paid tribute to Philip’s intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family.

The Right Reverend David Conner described the duke as a ‘remarkable man’ who was committed to ‘a host of down-to-earth enterprises’. He pointed out that the duke could be ‘abrupt’, and suggested that at times he could forget ‘just how intimidating he could be’. Princess Beatrice was seen to give a small chuckle as the Dean remarked: ‘He could be somewhat sharp in pricking what he thought to be bubbles of pomposity or sycophancy.’

Flowers at today’s service are a patriotic red, white and blue, at Her Majesty’s request. They included dendrobium orchids, which also featured in the Queen’s wedding bouquet, and eryngium – or sea holly – echoing the duke’s career in the Royal Navy and lifelong affection for the sea. There were also multiple tributes to his intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family and his country.

The 95-year-old monarch used a stick as she was walked to her seat by her disgraced son the Duke of York to give her ‘strength and stay’ Philip the send-off he wanted at a service attended by the Royal Family and his relatives, friends and people who benefitted from his charities. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were the only senior royals not there.

Despite battling mobility problems, she stood to pray and sing anthems during a 40-minute service that her husband of 73 years had helped plan for before his death last April. But chose Prince Andrew to support her as she arrived and left the church, clutching his elbow with one hand and a walking stick with the other.

The Queen had stood with tears in her eyes as the 1,800-strong congregation sang Guide Me O Thou Great Redeemer before the bells of Westminster Abbey rang out to mark the end of the memorial service for the Duke of Edinburgh.

After she leant on Andrew as she walked back out of the church, the Queen appeared to grimace as she walked to the car hunched over with the Duke of York at her side guiding her towards the Bentley.

She appeared to be holding tightly to her sticks and appeared to be making a great effort to get to the vehicle, concentrating very hard in taking each step. Once inside the car she appeared to be back to her normal composed self as the car slowly drove away. She waved to onlookers as she arrived and left the service.

The Queen listened as the Dean of Windsor paid tribute to Philip’s intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family.

The Right Reverend David Conner described the duke as a ‘remarkable man’ who was committed to ‘a host of down-to-earth enterprises’. He pointed out that the duke could be ‘abrupt’, and suggested that at times he could forget ‘just how intimidating he could be’. Princess Beatrice was seen to give a small chuckle as the Dean remarked: ‘He could be somewhat sharp in pricking what he thought to be bubbles of pomposity or sycophancy.’

Flowers at today’s service are a patriotic red, white and blue, at Her Majesty’s request. They included dendrobium orchids, which also featured in the Queen’s wedding bouquet, and eryngium – or sea holly – echoing the duke’s career in the Royal Navy and lifelong affection for the sea. There were also multiple tributes to his intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family and his country.

Today the monarch ensured that her beloved husband’s final wishes are fulfilled after his Covid-hit funeral left her sat alone without the rousing hymns and guests he loved so much. Her Majesty has been ‘actively involved’ in every element of his service of thanksgiving that will see Westminster Abbey packed to the rafters.

Even the smallest of touches have been overseen by the Queen, including the use of orchids that formed part of her 1947 wedding bouquet being used in small posies of flowers.

Prince Philip’s beloved Sea Cadets and young people who have taken his Duke of Edinburgh awards are centre stage at the service that will see the Abbey reverberate with the sound of hymns including Guide me, O thou great Redeemer.

All Prince Philip’s family chose to attend apart from Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. On Prince Andrew’s left is his brother the Earl of Wessex and Edward’s family the Countess of Wessex and their children Lady Louise Windsor and James, Viscount Severn.

Across an aisle on his right is the Princess Royal, her husband Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, the Duchess of Cornwall, Prince of Wales and the Queen.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte also attended with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and sat behind the Queen. Behind Andrew and Edward’s family were Peter Phillips, and Zara and Mike Tindall and their daughters.

The Duke of Edinburgh’s intellect, work ethic, sense of humour and devotion to his family were celebrated in an address by the Dean of Windsor.

The Right Reverend David Conner paid tribute to Philip as a ‘remarkable man’ who was committed to ‘a host of down-to-earth enterprises’.

He pointed out that the duke could be ‘abrupt’ and suggested that at times he could forget ‘just how intimidating he could be’.

Addressing the congregation in Westminster Abbey, Mr Conner said: ‘He was practical, wanting to put flesh upon his dreams, and (acknowledging the limitations of living in this so-called ‘real world’) he devoted his astonishing intellectual and physical energy, his enormous capacity for sheer hard work, to a host of down-to-earth enterprises.

‘These included the equipping of young people to face tomorrow’s challenges, the encouragement of respect and care for the natural order, and his pioneering work in facilitating conversation between representatives of the different world faiths.

‘Through his passionate commitment, he drew others to himself in admiration and respect and, in the case of those who lived and worked most closely to him, genuine love.’

Mr Conner added: ‘He would hate to think that I should paint a picture of him as a ‘plaster saint’; someone without the usual human foibles and failings.

‘He was far too self-aware ever to be taken in by flattery. Of course, it must be said that his life bore the marks of sacrifice and service.

‘Certainly, he could show great sympathy and kindness. There is no doubt that he had a delightfully engaging, and often self-deprecating, sense of humour.

‘It is quite clear that his mind held together both speculation and common sense. Moreover, nobody would ever doubt his loyalty and deep devotion to our Queen and to their family.

‘Yet, there were times when he could be abrupt; maybe, in robust conversation, forgetting just how intimidating he could be.

‘A kind of natural reserve sometimes made him seem a little distant. He could be somewhat sharp in pricking what he thought to be bubbles of pomposity or sycophancy.

‘On the other hand, we should not forget that he himself was sometimes wounded by being unfairly criticised or misunderstood.’

Concluding his address, the dean said: ‘As we give thanks for the life of a remarkable man, perhaps our greatest tribute to him, most especially in these far too troubled times, will be for us to accept the challenge, implicit in his life, to rekindle in our hearts something of that call, and to pray (as I think he did) for the inspiration and the guidance to play our part, however small, in working for a kinder future.

While the Queen’s arrival at Westminster Abbey was mentioned in the order of service, a final decision on her attendance was only confirmed two hours before because of her frailty.

The Princess Royal arrived at Westminster Abbey. Wearing a long green dress and hat, Anne arrived alongside her husband, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

Peter Phillips’ children Savannah and Isla were sitting next to their cousin Mia, daughter of Zara and Mike Tindall. The girls were dressed in navy with their hair fixed back with headbands.

Once inside Westminster Abbey, guests were escorted to their seats, with Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie and their husbands smiling at members of the Abbey’s chapter, or governing body, standing by the great West Door, as they walked in. The Earl and Countess of Wessex and their children also smiled warmly at the welcoming clergy.

Sophie, Countess of Wessex, and her daughter, Lady Louise, smiled and chatted to each other after taking their seats in the Abbey.

Earlier today, royal commentator Robert Jobson, author of Prince Philip’s Century, told GB News: ‘I think that Prince Andrew may play a more prominent role than we think earlier on. My understanding is that someone has to support the Queen and he may well be by her side. I think Charles will probably be with Camilla.’

Overnight, royal aides revealed the Queen has been ‘actively involved’ in plans for the service ‘with many elements reflecting Her Majesty’s wishes’ as the order of service was unveiled at midnight.

It includes several elements the Duke had planned for his funeral at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in April last year but which were forbidden by Covid restrictions at the time.

Among them is the involvement of Duke of Edinburgh (DofE) gold award winners and Sea Cadets, his expressed wish for the congregation to sing the rousing hymn Guide Me, O Thou Great Redeemer, and for clergy from the royal estates of Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral to play a special part.

His funeral at St George’s Chapel in Windsor was limited to just 30 mourners in the midst of the pandemic and mass singing was banned, with the Queen sitting alone in a mask.

Around 1,800 guests are due at today’s service, including British and European royalty, representatives of the many charities of which the duke was patron or president, Boris and Carrie Johnson, and Sir David Attenborough.

But the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are not returning from the US for the service.

While the Queen’s arrival was mentioned in the order of service, it is understood that a final decision on her attendance was not made until first thing this morning.

She has recently been forced to pull out of a string of engagements because of ill health and old age. She was unable to attend the Commonwealth Day service this month because of concerns about her mobility and comfort.

Palace and Abbey aides are thought to have taken steps to ensure that the service is less taxing for the Queen.

Instead of arriving at the usual West Entrance to the Abbey, which would involve steps and a long walk down the Nave in front of the cameras, the Queen could be driven around the side of the building and enter away from public view via the ‘Poet’s Entrance’.

She would then have a far shorter walk down the South Transept to her seat. It is likely she would walk with the aid of a stick.

The service will gave thanks for the duke’s dedication to family, nation and Commonwealth and recognise the importance of his legacy in creating opportunities for young people, promoting conservation, and supporting the Armed Forces.

One of the elements planned for the funeral which has now been included in the service will see nine Gold Award holders from The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, plus representatives from UK Cadet Force Associations, line entry routes into Westminster Abbey.

Philip, who died in April last year aged 99, launched the DofE Award in 1956 and was Colonel-in-Chief of the Army Cadet Force, a role he first took up in 1953.

A tenth DofE gold award holder, Doyin Sonibare, 28, from London, will give a tribute to His Royal Highness’s legacy, recognising the impact of the Award on young people across the globe.

The Very Reverend Dr David Hoyle, Dean of Westminster, will conduct the service and describe the duke in the Bidding as ‘a man of rare ability and distinction’ who ‘ever directed our attention away from himself.’

He will say: ‘He put privilege to work and understood his rank as a spur to service. Working at pace, with so many claims on his attention, he encouraged us to focus, as he was focussed, on the things that matter.

‘His was a discipline and character that seized opportunity and overcame obstruction and difficulty. We recall, with affection and respect, the sustained offering of a long life lived fully.’

It was the duke’s expressed wish that clergy from Windsor, Sandringham and Balmoral – known as The Queen’s domestic chaplains – played a part in his funeral service, but this was not possible due to the Covid restrictions.

Today the Reverend Kenneth MacKenzie Minister of Crathie Church, the regular place of worship of the British royal family when they are in residence at nearby Balmoral Castle, the Reverend Canon Jonathan Riviere, the Rector of Sandringham, and the Reverend Canon Martin Poll, Chaplain to the Royal Chapel of All Saints, Windsor Great Park, will offer prayers recognising Philip’s energy, spirit of adventure and ‘good stewardship of the environment’.

The service will also be attended by around 30 foreign royals, including Prince Albert of Monaco, Denmark’s Queen Margrethe, King Harald and Queen Sonja of Norway, and Spain’s King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia.

Source: Daily Mail

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